Re: 🍤 Food! (And recipes) for Traders

3
From Maya Krampf at wholesomeyum.com (lobster), and Lisa Bryan at downshiftology.com (sauce)
(with minor edits by me to avoid problems on your first try. Image is my dinner table)

Lobster

Ingredients
  • 4 large lobster tails (about 10 oz each)
  • 1/4 cup salted butter (1/2 stick, melted)
  • 2 cloves garlic (crushed)
  • 2 tsp lemon juice
  • 1/2 tsp paprika
  • 1 pinch cayenne pepper
Instructions
  1. If frozen, thaw lobster tails in refer overnight or submerged in cold water outside refer for 30 minutes.
  2. Preheat oven to broil. Rinse the thawed lobster tail shells. Set oven rack height so that prepped tails (see next step) on a lipped baking sheet will be 4 to 5 inches away from broiler heat element.
  3. Butterfly the top of the lobster tail shells with kitchen shears (sanitized sheet metal snips will work, but regular scissors won't). Cut down the center of the shell lengthwise, starting from the end opposite the tail fins. Continue cutting the shell until you reach the tail but don't cut the tail fins. Spread the split top shell away from the tail meat with your fingers. I find that an upside down soup spoon works well to spread the shell where it's tight by the tail fins... and to break the bottom shell away from the meat too. Put your fingers inside the split top shell and gently lift the meat up through the split top shell and away from the bottom shell, but the meat must stay attached by the tail fins. Close the split shell below the meat, and place the butterflied tail on the lipped baking sheet. Repeat for the other 3 lobster tails.
  4. In a small bowl, whisk together melted butter, garlic, lemon juice, paprika, and cayenne pepper. Brush the mixture onto the exposed lobster tail meat.
  5. Broil the lobster tails until the meat is opaque and lightly browned, about 1 minute per ounce of the heaviest individual tail. For example, let's say you're only broiling 2 lobster tails... a 10 oz tail, and a 12 ounce tail. Broil time would be about 12 minutes for all tails... regardless of how many tails you're broiling.
Hollandaise Sauce

Ingredients
  • 3 egg yolks
  • 1 Tbsp lemon juice
  • 1 Tbsp dijon mustard
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1 pinch cayenne pepper
  • 1/2 cup butter
  • 1 tsp parsley flakes
Instructions
  • Melt butter in a covered microwave safe bowl in microwave oven.
  • Combine the egg yolks, lemon juice, dijon mustard, salt, cayenne pepper, and butter in small saucepan and whisk vigorously for about 5 minutes.
  • While continuing to whisk, slowly drizzle melted butter into the saucepan.
  • While again continuing to whisk, heat the saucepan on medium-low heat until the mixture is warm. Be careful not to boil, and not to stop whisking.
  • Pour entire saucepan of sauce over lobster meat. Hollandaise sauce leftovers don't keep well.
  • Sprinkle parsley flakes atop the sauce on the lobster meat and on any pooled sauce on the plate.
“[A]s we know, there are known knowns—there are things we know we know. We also know there are known unknowns—that is to say we know there are some things we do not know. But there are also unknown unknowns—the ones we don’t know we don’t know.”—Donald Rumsfeld, 2002

Re: 🍤 Food! (And recipes) for Traders

5
This one is my home brew recipe that's loosely modeled after the old Weber's pickled pig knuckles which have been out of production for decades.

Pickled Shank Ham Scraps

Ingredients
  • 1 shank ham
  • 1 yellow onion
  • 1 large shaker of sea salt
  • 1 small shaker of black peppercorns
  • 6 dried whole chilis
  • 2 cups white vinegar
  • 2 cups spring water
Instructions
  • The ham in this recipe is the "low on the hog" and smoked ham (not the butt ham, nor a fresh ham). You really only need the lower scraps, so slice the widest part of the ham around the bone into ham steaks--1/2 inch to 3/4 inch thick. They freeze well and are great for breakfast. When you can no longer cut a full round steak due to bone protrusion, stop making steaks and start carving the meat longitudinally of the bone in heavy chunks. Leave any fat and skin attached to the meat chunks.
  • Chop the meat chunks into large Lego block sized pieces.
  • Place the pieces of ham into 3 quart size mason jars--filling each about 2/3 full.
  • Slice the onion (into rings), and then chop the rings in half.
  • Place the onion atop the ham in the 3 quart mason jars--filling the jars (but don't overfill).
  • Liberally dump several dozen peppercorns into each jar.
  • Place 2 chilis in each jar.
  • Liberally pour salt into each jar until the onion and ham looks like snowcapped mountains.
  • In a medium saucepan, combine the water and vinegar and bring to a boil.
  • Remove saucepan from heat and pour into jars.
  • Cap jars and let stand at room temperature for a few hours. Then place in refrigerator for at least 3 days before use.
Notes: This could be done with fresh feet, knuckles, hocks, or ham but it would require cleaning, slow simmering, and then recleaning the meat in advance. In any case, the brine will turn amber and cloudy over time. The darker the brine gets, the better the flavor. The dried chilis contain a beneficial bacteria that softens the meat and solidifies the fat into an opaque white buttery or cheesy delight. Any pieces of skin will be tan, are not edible, and must be sliced away from the fat and discarded. I like to eat this pickled ham with crackers, sharp white cheddar, and Spanish olives.
“[A]s we know, there are known knowns—there are things we know we know. We also know there are known unknowns—that is to say we know there are some things we do not know. But there are also unknown unknowns—the ones we don’t know we don’t know.”—Donald Rumsfeld, 2002


Re: 🍤 Food! (And recipes) for Traders

7
Tradehunter wrote: Fri Feb 16, 2024 3:01 am Might not look great to some, but if you know, then you know!
Looks mighty tasty. :razz: Reminds me of Whitetail Deer that I repeatedly whacked with a 12 gauge, dressed, skinned, and butchered years ago.
“[A]s we know, there are known knowns—there are things we know we know. We also know there are known unknowns—that is to say we know there are some things we do not know. But there are also unknown unknowns—the ones we don’t know we don’t know.”—Donald Rumsfeld, 2002

Re: 🍤 Food! (And recipes) for Traders

10
DaveTrader wrote: Sat Jun 22, 2024 5:50 am Wife and I had a little celebration dinner the other week.
The best things are right at Home...and some of them come right out of your cast ironRibeyIMG_2028.jpg
Mouth watering 🤤

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